iv0611:

Your anaconda don’t.

laughhard:

Every Sports Interview

laughhard:

Every Sports Interview

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This surrealistic timelapse doesn’t show an ocean in the sky. These are undulatus asperatus clouds rolling over Lincoln, Nebraska. Also known simply as asperatus, this cloud formation has been proposed as but not yet recognized as a distinctive cloud type. Their speed is much slower than shown in the animation, but the wave-like motion is accurate and is the source of the cloud’s name, which comes from the Latin word aspero, meaning to make rough. Though they appear stormy, asperatus clouds do not usually produce storms. They form under conditions similar to those of mammatus clouds, but wind shear at the cloud level causes the undulations to form. (Maybe some Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities going on there?) You can check many more images of asperatus clouds at the Cloud Appreciation Society’s gallery. (Image credit: A. Schueth, source video; submitted by leftcoastjunkies)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This surrealistic timelapse doesn’t show an ocean in the sky. These are undulatus asperatus clouds rolling over Lincoln, Nebraska. Also known simply as asperatus, this cloud formation has been proposed as but not yet recognized as a distinctive cloud type. Their speed is much slower than shown in the animation, but the wave-like motion is accurate and is the source of the cloud’s name, which comes from the Latin word aspero, meaning to make rough. Though they appear stormy, asperatus clouds do not usually produce storms. They form under conditions similar to those of mammatus clouds, but wind shear at the cloud level causes the undulations to form. (Maybe some Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities going on there?) You can check many more images of asperatus clouds at the Cloud Appreciation Society’s gallery. (Image credit: A. Schueth, source video; submitted by leftcoastjunkies)

fortheloveofmegan:

I would like to go to the Grotta Palazzese in Puglia, Italy. “Tucked inside a limestone cavern, this summer-only spot (open May through October) has hosted elegant dinners since the 18th century, when Italian nobility held banquets in the space.” - Conde` Nast Traveler

fortheloveofmegan:

I would like to go to the Grotta Palazzese in Puglia, Italy.
“Tucked inside a limestone cavern, this summer-only spot (open May through October) has hosted elegant dinners since the 18th century, when Italian nobility held banquets in the space.” - Conde` Nast Traveler

accioromione:

Philosopher’s Stone deleted scene

I FUCKING CRY LAUGHING EVERY TIME I SEE THIS ONLY BECAUSE OF HARRYS REACTION LIKE LOOK AT THE LAST GIF OMG DANIEL RADCLIFFE A+ ACTING OMG

(Source: harrypotterdailly)

straightwhiteboysanonymous:

Can we signal boost this creep?

straightwhiteboysanonymous:

Can we signal boost this creep?

sexysexnsuch:

ellescarred:

little-miss-fats:

source: robot-hugs

has anyone posted this yet? I love it! 

This was perfect

Important things 

-Evelyn

mymodernmet:

New York-based artist Kim Keever photographs colorful liquids blending together into captivating, abstract forms.

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Awesome Camouflage is marveling at this incredible praying mantis who looks more like a collection of sticks and bits of plants than a predatory insect. This exceptionally stealthy mantis belongs to the genus Toxodera, which consists of some of the largest mantids in the world. It was discovered and photographed by Peter Houlihan in Borneo:

Amidst the dense jungles of Borneo lives quite possibly the largest mantis in the world! Yet, despite its size, it remains nearly impossible to find. Late one night, I was collecting insects in the rainforest for my research when I encountered this brilliantly cryptic mantis amongst a swarm of unaware insects. I am still not sure how I spotted it, but it is by far the most impressive mantis I have ever seen.

[via National Geographic and RACERS]

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Awesome Camouflage is marveling at this incredible praying mantis who looks more like a collection of sticks and bits of plants than a predatory insect. This exceptionally stealthy mantis belongs to the genus Toxodera, which consists of some of the largest mantids in the world. It was discovered and photographed by Peter Houlihan in Borneo:

Amidst the dense jungles of Borneo lives quite possibly the largest mantis in the world! Yet, despite its size, it remains nearly impossible to find. Late one night, I was collecting insects in the rainforest for my research when I encountered this brilliantly cryptic mantis amongst a swarm of unaware insects. I am still not sure how I spotted it, but it is by far the most impressive mantis I have ever seen.

[via National Geographic and RACERS]